Basketball

North Carolina has been in the news a lot lately for passing a controversial law that opponents say does not give members of the LGBT community the anti-discrimination protections that they deserve. Though many have called for changes, the law remains on the books, and it's starting to have a big impact. According to recent reports, the NBA has decided not to play the All Star Game in Charlotte, North Carolina. They're possibly going to move it to New Orleans, Louisiana.

A Growing Threat

This is a move that the NBA has apparently been mulling for some time. When last asked, officials did not agree with the law, but they wouldn't say if they were moving venues. These recent reports could indicate that they were hoping for changes that didn't come, and now they'll officially pull the game.

Before the NBA Finals, Commissioner Adam Silver had noted that he wanted to see some progress. Though he can't make the legal changes in any realistic way, he was trying to pressure lawmakers. Since he hasn't seen that progress, this is the next step.

Does Charlotte Deserve It?

One interesting twist to this is that Charlotte, the city that is being punished, actually got the ball rolling with an anti-discrimination ordinance at the city level. The state-level law was a response to this, making it impossible for cities to pass their own laws. In essence, the city was trying to do the exact opposite of what happened, but the state government overruled them. That same law makes it so that local governments can't raise the city-wide minimum wage to anything more than the state minimum wage, and it got rid of some of the anti-discrimination safeguards that had been put in place for military veterans.

Will It Matter?

The lawmakers knew this could happen, so it's hard to know if the NBA's stance, and the publicity it has generated, will be enough to matter and make a difference. However, it is still important for residents in the state to keep an eye on this law to see if there are any legal changes in the works.

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