How much is my car accident lawsuit worth?

The McLaren P1 is an electric-gas hybrid vehicle with 903 horsepower. It also costs $1.15 million for those who want to buy one. The big price tag, however, was not enough to deter a very serious safety problem.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has recalled the McLaren P1 due to a problem with the vehicle's front hood, which -- due to defects in its design -- can suddenly fly open while the car is in motion. While the recall does not affect very many vehicle owners, the NHTSA says that the defect presents a significant safety hazard, especially considering that the car can travel at speeds of 250 miles per hour.

Problem Can Destabilize the Vehicle

Not only is this dangerous for the people driving and riding in the McLaren vehicle, but it is also dangerous for other vehicles on the road, which could be involved in an accident with a destabilized and out-of-control McLaren affected by the problem. According to the NHTSA, the hood problems stem from an issue with the secondary hood latch, which is in danger of not engaging. If the first latch fails, then the hood could open and obscure the driver's view of the road ahead of him or her and destabilize the vehicle.

Bruce McClaren Died in a Crash Caused by a Similar Issue

The McLaren built the P1 with special race technology modeled after Formula 1 racers -- the difference being that this vehicle is an electric-gas hybrid. McLaren has a long history in the race car industry and the company actually began as a race team back in 1963. The founder, Bruce McLaren, was from New Zealand and he was killed in a vehicle crash in 1970. Ironically, the reason for Bruce McLaren's fatal accident was a malfunctioning back trunk, which flew open while he was driving a prototype vehicle at a high rate of speed.

People injured by McClaren P1s affected with this defect could have strong injury claims for financial restitution against the manufacturer. This design defect is a clear oversight on the part of the manufacturer.

Facebook
Twitter