GMO LabelThere is a group of California voters who are working to gather the number of signatures necessary to put a proposition on the ballot in 2012 that requires the labeling of genetically engineered foods in California. Other states, such as Oregon, are engaged in similar efforts.

According to the group,  Canada, Japan, Australia, the UK, and all 27 countries in Europe have banned the use of these synthetic proteins because they have not been proven safe.

In addition to the group seeking signatures of registered California voters in order to get the proposition on the ballot, it is working in conjunction with another group to petition the FDA to require the labeling of GMOs nationwide. The image below is an infographic representing the over 1,000,000 comments submitted in support of this federal effort. The FDA has approved the use of GMOs because they have not been proven to be unsafe.

Labeling GMOs in the US

I have previously written about one study that found genetically modified corn may cause organ failure. Here is another article detailing the potential side effects of GMOs, and more information about the way they are addressed in other countries. You can look here for more information about the current status of the nationwide effort soliciting an FDA response.

GMOs may be more prevalent than you think, with 8 currently approved types of crops (including corn, soy, alfalfa, etc.). I was surprised to find that since their approval, most, if not all, of the major corporate manufacturers are using the crops in their products.

The next time you eat a bowl of your name brand cereal, I invite you to reflect on the fact that not only are you probably eating a GMO, but also that they are banned in the European Union, and the FDA does not require the manufacturer to tell you that they are in there. I recently wrote to one of the major corporations that makes a cereal I buy and asked whether they use GMOs, and they stated that they use them in the same proportion that they are available on the market.

Just some food for thought!

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