By:  LINDSEY O'NEILL, ESQ.

As Elizabeth Edward's new book, Resilience, is about to hit the shelves, she has given several interview (including Oprah's) discussing the admitted affair her husband, John Edwards, had with Rielle Hunter and the possibility that he  is the father of Hunter's child out of that affair.  Elizabeth Edwards apparently commented to Oprah that if John Edwards is determined to be the baby's father, while he would certainly have legal (and presumably other) obligations to the child, that the child will have no affect on Mrs. Edward's life.  As I continue to see the comments on the web regarding Elizabeth's remarks, I see that this has you all thinking.  Well, it got me thinking a bit too...

What happens when a child is born out of a cheating husband's affair with another woman?  Assuming paternity is established, the man will be required to pay child support.  (This is of course only one issue of many, but we're focusing on that issue here).  The man is required to pay child support in accordance with child support guidelines set by the state.  His income must be calculated.  What if he's the stay-at-home husband and his wife is the breadwinner?  Ah ha...  in many states his wife's earnings are considered marital income.  What then?  The betrayed wife not only gets cheated on, but then has to take some of that money she earns to pay child support to the woman who had an affair with her husband?   Can you even imagine writing that check every month? 

Now, I am all for what's best for the child.  I certainly wouldn't be in favor of a child suffering because of mistakes made by his/her parent(s).  The law clearly favors taking care of the child, which is the important thing.  I just couldn't help wondering about the experiences of betrayed breadwinner-wives out there in this kind of situation.
If you're struggling with paternity, child support, infidelity, or other family law matters, contact a family law lawyer in your area today. 

For more information about how to calculate child support, check out LawInfo's Free Legal Resource Center.  Here are few links to get you started: 

http://www.lawinfo.com/Family-Child-Support.html

http://resources.lawinfo.com/Search.html?q=child+support

http://resources.lawinfo.com/Search.html?&q=paternity%20child%20support%20payment&fq=category:Child%20Support

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